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Can Dogs Eat Blueberries?

Can Dogs Eat Blueberries?

Yes, dogs can eat blueberries. However, before introducing any new food into your pet’s diet, consult your veterinarian to get the best advice about your pup’s specific nutritional needs. Blueberries can be a great snack for your dog to enjoy as they’re a good source of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. 

Health Benefits of Blueberries for Dogs

We’ve established that dogs can eat blueberries. But are blueberries good for dogs? Absolutely. When served appropriately and in moderation, these little blue morsels are packed with nutritional benefits. 

Health benefits include:

  • Low calories, so it’s easy to not overindulge
  • Excellent source of vitamins C and K for immune system support
  • Hydrating, with 85% water content
  • Excellent source of antioxidants, including flavonoids
  • High fiber to support digestion

How to Feed Your Dog Blueberries

Prepare to feed your dog fresh blueberries by first giving them a good rinse. Now you’re ready to sprinkle a few over your dog’s regular food, use them as training treats or reward good behavior by feeding them one at a time. 

For most small dog breeds, about 10 blueberries are an appropriate amount for a light snack. Large breeds can have more—up to about 50 per day—but keep in mind that treats should make up no more than 10% of your dog’s daily calories.

Featured Dog Treats with Blueberries

FAQs About Feeding Your Dog Blueberries

Yes, dogs can eat blueberries safely. Blueberries contain antioxidants that can help prevent cell damage in dogs. They’re also full of fiber and phytochemicals and can be an excellent snack in place of traditional treats.

Some dog treats and foods contain dried blueberries. Dried blueberries, however, can have a higher sugar content than fresh blueberries, and some pre-packed dried blueberries contain corn syrup, which is not suitable for dogs. While dried blueberries can be acceptable for dogs to eat, fresh or frozen blueberries are the ideal option for your pup.

Many dogs can eat frozen blueberries as a snack or treat. Frozen blueberries can, however, be a choking hazard for small breed dogs. If you have a petite pup, stick to fresh blueberries.

Blueberry muffins tend to be high in sugar and carbohydrates and are not the best nutritional option for your pup. Some dogs may experience gastrointestinal upset, pancreatitis or diarrhea after eating blueberry muffins. Additionally, dogs eating foods like blueberry muffins may be consuming excess calories in their diet and habits like these could lead to obesity over time. The sugar in most blueberry muffins can contribute to dental cavities, gum disease or tooth decay.

Yes, small dogs can eat blueberries. Blueberries are a nutritious snack for both small and large dogs, providing vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Plus, they are low in calories with fiber and vitamins C and K to help support the immune system. Don’t feed frozen blueberries to small breed dogs, however, as they can be a choking hazard.

As with all treats, moderation is key. For most small dog breeds, about 10 blueberries are an appropriate amount for a light snack. Large breeds can have more—up to about 50 per day—but keep in mind that treats should make up no more than 10% of your dog’s daily calories. If dogs munch on too many, the additional fiber may lead to digestive issues—especially for pups with sensitive stomachs.

While blueberries are not toxic to dogs, many wild berries are so it is never recommended to feed your dog anything found in the wild even if you may think it’s a blueberry. Toxic berries may lead to vomiting, diarrhea, excessive drooling, trouble breathing or seizures. Toxic berries include gooseberries, holly berries, juniper berries, dogwood berries, mistletoe berries, salmonberries, baneberries and pokeberries. If you believe your dog may have ingested one of these, reach out to your veterinarian immediately.

If your dog has overconsumed blueberries, they may experience digestive upset. Many fruits—including blueberries—are high in fiber, and too much fiber in your dog’s diet may lead them to experience diarrhea, especially if they have a sensitive stomach.

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