Dog - Health & Wellness

Puppy Vaccination – First Steps for Protection & Prevention

Starting off on the right paw with your puppy’s health is really about looking ahead. You can solve a significant part of your puppy’s physical health risk through simple prevention.

At the first visit

Puppy vaccination is not just a good idea; vaccinations are required by most cities, dog parks, grooming, boarding and daycare facilities. Getting your pup on a regular routine for shots and preventative measures ensures their ability to ward off diseases common to their species.

Let’s take a look at the diseases common to dogs and some important steps to avoiding them.

When your puppy is six to eight weeks old, your veterinarian will administer a combination vaccine (DHPP) to protect it from four dangerous diseases: canine distemper, infectious hepatitis, parainfluenza and parvovirus infection.

Canine distemper
A viral disease that usually begins like an upper respiratory infection or cold but soon progresses to seizures and often death. It is usually transmitted by foxes, coyotes, raccoons and dogs.

Infectious hepatitis
Another serious viral disease. The virus responsible for the disease is passed in the urine and causes liver and kidney infections.

Parainfluenza
A viral disease that contributes to kennel cough. The disease is spread when tiny droplets of nasal secretions fly through the air and are inhaled by other dogs, and it causes upper respiratory infection and coughing.

The injectable form of the vaccine protects against disease but doesn't prevent dogs from being contagious.

A nose-spray vaccination that combines parainfluenza virus and Bordetella (a bacteria that contributes to kennel cough) vaccines protects your pup from both infection and transmission.

  • Parvovirus infection
    A viral disease that causes severe vomiting and diarrhea for your pet because of an intestinal tract infection. The virus is passed in the feces and can remain infectious in contaminated soil for one to two years. Untreated infections may lead to death.

It's never too early to schedule your puppy's vaccinations

Putting it on the calendar now means you won’t forget about these important measures.

If possible, puppies should remain with their mother until they are at least eight weeks of age.

Vaccinations timeline

  • 5 weeks
    • Parvo
  • 6 weeks
    • Combination vaccine* without lepto
    • Corona: where corona is a concern.
    • Roundworm
  • 8 weeks
    • Heartworm preventative
    • Flea & tick control
  • 9 weeks
    • Combination vaccine* without lepto
    • Corona: where corona is a concern.
  • 12 weeks
    • Combination vaccine*
    • Rabies: age at vaccination may vary according to local law.
    • Lepto: only for dogs at risk.
    • Lyme: where Lyme disease is a concern or if traveling to areas where the disease is a concern.
    • Corona: where corona is a concern.
  • 15 weeks
    • Combination vaccine*
    • Lepto: only for dogs at risk.
    • Lyme: where Lyme disease is a concern or if traveling to areas where the disease is a concern.
    • Corona: where corona is a concern.
  • *combination vaccine
    • Often called a 5-way vaccine, a combination vaccine usually includes adenovirus cough and hepatitis, distemper, parainfluenza and parvovirus. Some combination vaccines may also include leptospirosis (7-way vaccines) and/or coronavirus. The inclusion of either canine adenovirus-1 or adenovirus-2 in a vaccine will protect against both adenovirus cough and hepatitis; adenovirus-2 is highly preferred.
      Source: lantanaatlantis.com

Schedule your puppy’s first vaccinations today if he has not been vaccinated against parainfluenza, canine distemper, infectious hepatitis, and parvovirus infection. Dogs should receive a Bordetella vaccine two weeks prior to exposure to other dogs.

Once the first round of vaccinations are complete, and your puppy has now become an elder statesman and aged from six weeks to nine weeks, your puppy will need to receive a set of follow up vaccinations.